What do you think about Don't use it as an alarm clock! Five ways to cut down on phone use?

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Social media use in the 30 minutes before bed is independently associated with disturbed sleep among young adults.

Keep your phone out of the bedroom

Many of us use our phones as alarm clocks, meaning they are the last thing we see at night and the first thing we see in the morning, perhaps even before our eyes are fully open. A 2017 study found that “social media use in the 30 minutes before bed is independently associated with disturbed sleep among young adults”. So, charge your phone somewhere other than the bedroom and buy an alarm clock instead.

Control your notifications

Even if you manage to put down your phone, chances are it will buzz within a couple of seconds, begging you to pick it up again. Take the time to do a deep dive into your notification settings. The Center for Humane Technology (CHT) – a non-profit set up by former Google product manager Tristan Harris to help people “live more intentionally with their devices” – recommends disabling all notifications that are not sent by people. That allows those from messaging apps, but not reminders that “14 people liked your photo”.

Actively limit your screen time

The newest versions of Android and iOS, the two most popular mobile operating systems, have features that track your screen time, offering weekly reports on how often you pick up your phone, how many hours you use it for each day and which apps you use the most. But instead of just reading the reports, take a proactive approach: turn on limits for apps you want to cut down on, for example by limiting Twitter to one hour a day. Yes, you can override it – but just being shaken out of passive scrolling may be enough to make you find something better to do.

Go grey

Switching your phone to greyscale ensures that real life is always the more vivid option. This is Harris’s signature recommendation because it neuters user-interface designers’ carefully tested psychological prompts to keep us coming back for more. On iOS, go to Settings | General | Accessibility | Accessibility Shortcut | Colour Filters: “This allows you to triple-tap the home button to toggle greyscale on and off, so you keep colour when you need it,” the CHT says. There is no consistent way to do this across Android devices, but most have an equivalent in the accessibility menu.

Practise intentionality

Not everything has a tech solution. Ask yourself before you pick up your phone: “Why am I doing this?” Sometimes that can be enough to stop yourself from aimlessly scrolling; admit to yourself that the answer is: “I am bored during this seven-second lift journey,” and you may reconsider.

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News Desk
INFLUENCER
22 comments
30 March 2019
Your central nervous system is the information highway of your body. Sleep is necessary to keep it functioning properly, but chronic insomnia can disrupt how your body usually sends information. During sleep, pathways form between nerve cells (neurons) in your brain that help you remember new information you’ve learned. Sleep deprivation leaves your brain exhausted, so it can’t perform its duties as well. You may also find it more difficult to concentrate or learn new things. The signals your body sends may also come at a delay, decreasing your coordination skills and increasing your risks for accidents. Sleep deprivation also negatively affects your mental abilities and emotional state. You may feel more impatient or prone to mood swings. It can also compromise decision-making processes and creativity. If sleep deprivation continues long enough, you could start having hallucinations—seeing or hearing things that aren’t there. A lack of sleep can also trigger mania in people who have manic depression. Other psychological risks include: impulsive behavior depression paranoia suicidal thoughts You may also end up experiencing micro sleep in the day. During these episodes, you’ll fall asleep for a few seconds or minutes without realizing it. Micro sleep is out of your control and can be extremely dangerous if you’re driving. It can also make you more prone to injury due to trips and falls. Immune system While you sleep, your immune system produces protective, infection-fighting substances like cytokines. It uses these substances to combat foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses. Cytokines also help you sleep, giving your immune system more energy to defend your body against illness. Sleep deprivation prevents your immune system from building up its forces. If you don’t get enough sleep, your body may not be able to fend off invaders. It may also take you longer to recover from illness. Long-term sleep deprivation also increases your risk for chronic illnesses like diabetes and heart disease. Respiratory system The relationship between sleep and the respiratory system goes both ways. A nighttime breathing disorder called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can interrupt your sleep and lower the quality of your sleep. As you wake up throughout the night, this can cause sleep deprivation, which leaves you more vulnerable to respiratory infections like the common cold and flu. Sleep deprivation can also make existing respiratory diseases worse, such as chronic lung illness. Digestive system Along with eating too much and not exercising, sleep deprivation is another risk factor for becoming overweight and obesity. Sleep affects the levels of two hormones, leptin and ghrelin, which control feelings of hunger and fullness. Leptin tells your brain that you’ve had enough to eat. Without enough sleep, your brain reduces leptin and raises ghrelin, which is an appetite stimulant. The flux of these hormones could explain nighttime snacking or why someone may overeat later in night. A lack of sleep can also contribute to weight gain by making you feel too tired to exercise. Sleep deprivation also prompts your body to release higher levels of insulin after you eat. Insulin controls your blood sugar level. Higher insulin levels promote fat storage and increase your risk for type 2 diabetes. Cardiovascular system Sleep affects processes that keep your heart and blood vessels healthy, including your blood sugar, blood pressure, and inflammation levels. It also plays a vital role in your body’s ability to heal and repair the blood vessels and heart. People who don’t sleep enough are more likely to get cardiovascular disease. One analysis published in the European Journal of Preventive Oncology linked insomnia to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Endocrine system Hormone production is dependent on your sleep. For testosterone production, you need at least three hours of uninterrupted sleep, which is about the time of your first REM episode. Waking up throughout the night could affect hormone production. This interruption can also affect growth hormone production, especially in children and adolescents. These hormones help build muscle mass and repair cells and tissues. The pituitary gland releases growth hormones continuously, but sleep and exercise also help induce the release of this hormone.

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Suzanne
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30 March 2019
If you’ve ever spent a night tossing and turning, you already know how you’ll feel the next day — tired, cranky, and out of sorts. But missing out on the recommended 7 to 9 hours of shut-eye nightly does more than make you feel groggy and grumpy. The long term effects of sleep deprivation are real. It drains your mental abilities and puts your physical health at real risk. Science has linked poor slumber with all kinds of health problems, from weight gain to a weakened immune system. Sleep deprivation, also known as insufficient sleep, is the condition of not having enough sleep. ... A chronic sleep-restricted state can cause fatigue, daytime sleepiness, clumsiness and weight loss or weight gain. It adversely affects the brain and cognitive function. Sleep deprivation prevents your immune system from building up its forces. If you don't get enough sleep, your body may not be able to fend off invaders. It may also take you longer to recover from illness. Long-term sleep deprivation also increases your risk for chronic illnesses like diabetes and heart disease.

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